London Bus

Posted by Nitin (Shanghai, China) on 16 September 2014 in Art & Design.

"Lots of people want to ride with you in the limo, but what you want is someone who will take the bus with you when the limo breaks down."
--
Oprah Winfrey

The ever famous London Red Bus. An iconic sight in London, and all over the world. They have very similar ones in Bombay too, which is not surprising considering there are a plenty of British leftovers and architectural heritage in Mumbai of today.

Some facts about the London buses:
Before 1907, buses were painted in different colours to signify their route. Due to fierce competition between bus companies, London General Omnibus Company (LGOC) – which became the biggest bus operator in the capital – painted their fleet of buses red in order to stand out from the competition.

After encouragement from the Metropolitan Police they also introduced numbers on the buses to signify different routes. The Routemaster bus is symbolic of London but this couldn’t save them from being withdrawn from service on 9th December 2005. They were replaced with easy access low-floor buses. However two Routemasters are still in use today on heritage routes. These are Route 9 from Kensington High Street to Aldwych and Route 15 from Trafalgar Square to Tower Hill.

Bus drivers must obtain a Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC). This involves completing three tests: a theory and hazard perception, a case study and demonstration, and a practical driving. It takes around 55 hours of practical training for a bus driver to pass. For more detailed information on becoming a bus driver this blog is very informative.

You can read more interesting facts here: http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2014/01/18-things-you-didnt-know-about-london-buses/

Ronnie 2¢ from Atlantic Shores, United Kingdom

Strange how we get nostalgic about something like a bus . .

16 Sep 2014 5:43am

franz from Baden, Austria

love their iconic colour and miss the roadmaster ...
great compo and frame, btw !

16 Sep 2014 12:31pm

 

Nikon D700
1/40 second
F/10.0
ISO 250
29 mm

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